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Late San Antonio philanthropist’s artsy penthouse spices up market for $7.25 million

Late San Antonio philanthropist’s penthouse spices up market for $7.2M

rooftop
The two-story penthouse is in Southtown. Douglas Elliman
living space
Art elements are purposefully placed throughout the home. Douglas Elliman
dining room
The open-air quality of the property provides a palatial feel. Douglas Elliman
bedroom
The home has six bedrooms. Douglas Elliman
Art
The impressive art collection offers a gallery vibe.  Douglas Elliman
kitchen
White spaces juxtopose well with the colorful art throughout the home, which boasts two kitchens. Douglas Elliman
pool
The vast rooftop space offers a spot for a dip. Douglas Elliman
rooftop
living space
dining room
bedroom
Art
kitchen
pool

The former San Antonio penthouse of the late philanthropist and art collector Linda Pace — whose parents launched the Pace picante sauce empire — has landed on the market with a price tag of $7.25 million.

The two-story Camp Street penthouse encompasses 15,076 square feet in the historic Southtown district. The property features a private rooftop with 7,500 square feet of open-air space offering 360-degree views, a jetted swim spa, and irrigated gardens. The penthouse provided exhibition space for Pace’s extensive art collection, which is now housed at the Ruby City art museum.

Pace purchased the entire building in 2001 and converted it into “one of the most prestigious residential properties in San Antonio,” according to Douglas Elliman Texas, where Michael Reisor has the listing. The Camp Street Residents project occupies a structure built in 1926 that once housed the Duerler Candy Factory.

Highlights of the penthouse include:

  • Six bedrooms.
  • Seven full and three half-bathrooms.
  • Industrial loft space with “Soho vibe.”
  • Private elevators.
  • Four underground parking spaces.
  • High-end Miele appliances in both kitchens.
  • Pocket porch terrace on each floor.
  • Vast collection of contemporary art.
  • More than 2,000 feet of separate storage space for art.
  • Full-time concierge service for all 20 condos at Camp Street Residences.

Pace died in 2007 at age 62. Her parents started Pace Foods, their picante sauce business, in 1948. Twenty-one years later, Pace’s husband, Christopher “Kit” Goldsbury, joined the company. In 1982, Pace and Goldsbury bought Pace Foods. The couple split up five years later.

Campbell Soup bought Pace Foods in 1994 for a little over $1.1 billion. At the time, Goldsbury was the sole owner of Pace Foods. In the 1980s, he purchased Linda Pace’s 50 percent stake for $95 million.

A year after the Campbell deal, Pace — an artist in her own right — founded Artpace San Antonio, a nonprofit residency program for artists. Goldsbury, with an estimated net worth of $1.7 billion, is the driving force behind San Antonio’s wildly popular Pearl development.