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Image courtesy of Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, México, D.F. Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Mexico has the longest printmaking tradition in all the Americas - dating back to 1539. Spurred by the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the golden age of printmaking began in the 1920s and lasted through the 1940s. The great influence of the revolution reveals itself in the prints included in this exhibition, ranging from Rivera’s heroic depiction of Emiliano Zapata, to Siqueiros’s exploration of sculpture in his large-scale lithographs, to Orozco’s condemnation of war.

A selection of artworks in this exhibition by the next generation of Mexican printmakers - the artists who founded the collaborative print workshop El Taller de Gráfica Popular in 1937 - illustrate the lasting influence of "los tres grandes," and include masterful lithographs and linocuts by Jesus Escobedo, Leopoldo Mendez, and Francisco Mora.

Mexico has the longest printmaking tradition in all the Americas - dating back to 1539. Spurred by the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the golden age of printmaking began in the 1920s and lasted through the 1940s. The great influence of the revolution reveals itself in the prints included in this exhibition, ranging from Rivera’s heroic depiction of Emiliano Zapata, to Siqueiros’s exploration of sculpture in his large-scale lithographs, to Orozco’s condemnation of war.

A selection of artworks in this exhibition by the next generation of Mexican printmakers - the artists who founded the collaborative print workshop El Taller de Gráfica Popular in 1937 - illustrate the lasting influence of "los tres grandes," and include masterful lithographs and linocuts by Jesus Escobedo, Leopoldo Mendez, and Francisco Mora.

Mexico has the longest printmaking tradition in all the Americas - dating back to 1539. Spurred by the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the golden age of printmaking began in the 1920s and lasted through the 1940s. The great influence of the revolution reveals itself in the prints included in this exhibition, ranging from Rivera’s heroic depiction of Emiliano Zapata, to Siqueiros’s exploration of sculpture in his large-scale lithographs, to Orozco’s condemnation of war.

A selection of artworks in this exhibition by the next generation of Mexican printmakers - the artists who founded the collaborative print workshop El Taller de Gráfica Popular in 1937 - illustrate the lasting influence of "los tres grandes," and include masterful lithographs and linocuts by Jesus Escobedo, Leopoldo Mendez, and Francisco Mora.

WHEN

WHERE

McNay Art Museum
6000 N. New Braunfels Ave.
San Antonio, TX 78209
https://www.mcnayart.org/exhibitions/current/los-tres-grandes-obras-de-rivera-siqueiros-y-orozco

TICKET INFO

Free-$20
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