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Photo courtesy of Ryan Takaba

During his BSC Berlin Residency, Ryan Takaba traveled to Munich to visit the aviation wing at the History of Science Museum, where he researched early aviation and its experimental objects such as balloons, parachutes, and kites. Combining this research with his ongoing interest in private altars, death rites, and mourning rituals, Takaba has created an installation that references the passing of his grandmother and one's relationship to flight. 

In "A Relationship with Flight," a sculpture taking the form of a kite includes fresh flowers that change over time. A spherical helium-filled balloon is covered with ash, which weighs it down and causes it to scatter about the space. Parachute sails are cast in wax with a burning wick to symbolize the passage of time. Like the mourning objects on his grandmother’s altar, these objects respond to an unseen physicality; even the presence of human beings in the gallery space affects the room temperature, which causes the objects to move and change.

The exhibition will remain on display through May 9, 2021.

During his BSC Berlin Residency, Ryan Takaba traveled to Munich to visit the aviation wing at the History of Science Museum, where he researched early aviation and its experimental objects such as balloons, parachutes, and kites. Combining this research with his ongoing interest in private altars, death rites, and mourning rituals, Takaba has created an installation that references the passing of his grandmother and one's relationship to flight.

In "A Relationship with Flight," a sculpture taking the form of a kite includes fresh flowers that change over time. A spherical helium-filled balloon is covered with ash, which weighs it down and causes it to scatter about the space. Parachute sails are cast in wax with a burning wick to symbolize the passage of time. Like the mourning objects on his grandmother’s altar, these objects respond to an unseen physicality; even the presence of human beings in the gallery space affects the room temperature, which causes the objects to move and change.

The exhibition will remain on display through May 9, 2021.

During his BSC Berlin Residency, Ryan Takaba traveled to Munich to visit the aviation wing at the History of Science Museum, where he researched early aviation and its experimental objects such as balloons, parachutes, and kites. Combining this research with his ongoing interest in private altars, death rites, and mourning rituals, Takaba has created an installation that references the passing of his grandmother and one's relationship to flight.

In "A Relationship with Flight," a sculpture taking the form of a kite includes fresh flowers that change over time. A spherical helium-filled balloon is covered with ash, which weighs it down and causes it to scatter about the space. Parachute sails are cast in wax with a burning wick to symbolize the passage of time. Like the mourning objects on his grandmother’s altar, these objects respond to an unseen physicality; even the presence of human beings in the gallery space affects the room temperature, which causes the objects to move and change.

The exhibition will remain on display through May 9, 2021.

WHEN

WHERE

Blue Star Contemporary
116 Blue Star
San Antonio, TX 78204
https://bluestarcontemporary.org/

TICKET INFO

Admission is free.
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