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The Royal Family/Twitter [https://twitter.com/RoyalFamily]

The world will bid a final "goodbye and thank you, Ma'am" to Britain's Queen Elizabeth II at her state funeral on Monday, September 19 at London's Westminster Abbey.

While the service for Her Majesty, who passed away September 8, will be attended by 2,000 family, friends, dignitaries, and heads of state, the event is expected to draw a record 4.1 billion viewers from around the world.

In the United States, every major network, broadcast outlet, and streaming service will provide coverage. And in San Antonio, viewers will need to get up before the sun to tune in live. The funeral starts at 5 am local time, with many noteworthy events happening before and after it (see schedule, below).

Here is a complete guide to the network, cable, and streaming service coverage, per the L.A. Times and Hollywood Reporter. (All times are local to San Antonio.)

Networks (television and streaming):

  • PBS: PBS will carry the BBC’s live coverage from London, starting at 3 am. A primetime special, The State Funeral of HM Queen Elizabeth II: Events of the Day, will then be broadcast at 7 pm.
  • ABC: David Muir and Robin Roberts will anchor coverage, starting at 4:30 am.
  • NBC: Savannah Guthrie, Hoda Kotb, and Lester Holt will anchor coverage, starting at 4:30 am.
  • CBS: Gayle King and Norah O’Donnell will anchor coverage (time TBA).

Cable networks (television and streaming):

  • BBC America: Coverage from London will start at 3 am.
  • CNN: Anderson Cooper and Erin Burnett will anchor coverage starting at 4 am, with additional anchors and reporters joining throughout the morning.
  • MSNBC: Chris Jansing will anchor coverage, beginning at 2 am, following with a special edition of Morning Joe from London and continuing through services.
  • C-SPAN: Live coverage will begin at 4:30 am.
  • Bloomberg TV: Live coverage will run from 4-6:30 am.
  • Fox News Channel: Martha MacCallum, Ainsley Earhardt, and Piers Morgan will anchor coverage, starting at 2 am.

Other streaming options:

  • BritBox will stream BBC live coverage, starting at 3:30 am.
  • BBC is live-streaming from London, 24 hours a day, on their news app and at www.bbc.com/news. (Click on the Queen Elizabeth II tab.)
  • ITV News offers live-streaming at www.itv.com/news and through YouTube.
  • Sky News offers live-streaming at news.sky.com, as well as through Peacock and YouTube.
  • Subscription-based streaming platforms (with free trials available) will be streaming the funeral, including: FuboTV, Sling, YouTube TV, Peacock Premium, Hulu + Live TV, and Paramount+. The service will be available to stream on regular Hulu as soon as it concludes.

Schedule of events

The funeral service itself will begin at 11 am in London (BST), which is 5 am in San Antonio (CDT). The service is expected to last about an hour, but it's preceded and followed by other events that also will be broadcast. Here is a schedule of events for the day, according to this handy guide from BBC. All times below are CDT.

12:30 am: The Queen's lying-in-state at Westminster Hall will end. Hundreds of thousands (including soccer legend David Beckham) have been "queueing up" and waiting in line up to 14 hours to walk by her coffin and pay their respects. The BBC is live-streaming the lying-in-state here.

2 am: The doors of Westminster Abbey will open for guests to begin arriving for the state funeral. Heads of state — including U.S. President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden — will attend, as will royal family members from across Europe (many of whom were blood relatives of the Queen). Find the guest list here.

4:44 am: About 15 minutes before the funeral, the Queen's coffin will be carried, via gun carriage, from Westminster Hall to Westminster Abbey. Senior members of the royal family (including King Charles and princes William and Harry) will follow the coffin in the procession.

5 am: The funeral at Westminster Abbey begins. It will be presided over by the Dean of Westminster David Hoyle and the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby.

5:55 am: Near the end of the funeral, a bugle call called "Last Post" will be played, and two minutes of silence will be observed nationally across the UK. Then the "new" national anthem "God Save the King" will be sung and a lament will be played by the Queen's piper.

6:15 am: A walking procession — including military bands and members of the armed services — will draw the coffin from the Abbey to Wellington Arch.

7 am: The coffin will be transferred to a state hearse for its final journey to Windsor.

9 am: The state hearse will arrive in Windsor for a walking procession up Windsor Castle's Long Walk. Members of the armed forces will line the three-mile route, and members of the royal family will meet the cortege outside the castle.

10 am: The coffin will enter St. George's Chapel for a committal service attended by a congregation of 800. At the conclusion of the 45-minute service, the Queen's coffin will be lowered into the royal vault, and the royal family will leave the chapel. The service will include many traditions symbolizing the end of the Queen's reign, including the removal of the Imperial State Crown and the Sovereign's orb and scepter from the top of the coffin. (Read more about what to expect here.)

1:30 pm: The Queen will be buried together with her late husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, at the King George VI memorial chapel inside St. George's Chapel. The private ceremony is just for family, and it is unclear whether any part of it will be made public.

The Royal Family/Twitter [https://twitter.com/RoyalFamily]

Texas joins world in mourning as Queen Elizabeth II passes away at 96

farewell to the queen

Editor’s note: As the world marks this historic passing and end of an era, CultureMap looks back at a Texan’s photos (above) of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in London in 2012, featured in a piece by former CultureMap Houston society editor Shelby Hodge.

The world has paused as Queen Elizabeth II, the longest-serving monarch in United Kingdom’s history, passed away at the age of 96 on Thursday, September 8 at Balmoral, the Scottish castle and holiday home of the Royal Family.

The Queen died peacefully at Balmoral this afternoon, read a statement from Buckingham Palace. The King and The Queen Consort will remain at Balmoral this evening and will return to London tomorrow.

She was surrounded by family; when doctors placed her under supervision, her children traveled to Balmoral, joined by grandson Prince William. Prince Harry is en route, according to news reports.

Per ABC News, Queen Elizabeth’s funeral will take place (tentatively) at Westminster Abbey 10 days after her death, following the tradition of observing a national period of mourning. Notably, she would be the first sovereign to have a funeral there since 1760.

Following the services, the queen is expected to be buried at St. George's Chapel in a private service on the grounds of Windsor Castle. She will be laid to rest next to her father, King George VI; her sister, Princess Margaret; and Prince Philip, her husband of 73 years.

Now, in keeping with tradition, Queen Elizabeth’s passing ushers in her son, formerly known as Prince Charles, as king; he will thus be known as King Charles III.

His Majesty The King, Charles released a the following statement after his mother’s passing:

The death of my beloved Mother, Her Majesty The Queen, is a moment of the greatest sadness for me and all members of my family.

We mourn profoundly the passing of a cherished Sovereign and a much-loved Mother. I know her loss will be deeply felt throughout the country, the Realms and the Commonwealth, and by countless people around the world.

During this period of mourning and change, my family and I will be comforted and sustained by our knowledge of the respect and deep affection in which The Queen was so widely held.

Queen Elizabeth’s reign spanned 70 years, beginning at post-World War II recovery to a transition from empire to Commonwealth. She witnessed the end of the Cold War and watched as the UK entered, and ultimately withdrew from, the European Union.

But perhaps no event, however, connected her to the world — especially those not in the Commonwealth — more than her public presence and statements following the death of Princess Diana of Wales, who lost her life 25 years ago this month.

Texas last hosted the queen 31 years ago. Her trip included a private dinner at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, a trek to Johnson Space Center, and an endearing moment at Houston’s oldest Black Baptist church, where she joyfully tapped her toes to the gleeful gospel music.

The beloved Queen Elizabeth II passed away on Thursday, September 8.

The Royal Family/Twitter [https://twitter.com/RoyalFamily]
The beloved Queen Elizabeth II passed away on Thursday, September 8.

Country music icon and Texas legend Mickey Gilley passes away at 86

remembering mickey gilley

A Texas country music icon has passed away. Mickey Gilley, the artist whose career spanned more than 50 years, died surrounded by his family on May 7, according to Pasadena mayor Jeff Wagner. He was 86.

Born in 1936 in Natchez, Mississippi to a famed family that included iconic cousins Jerry Lee Lewis and Jimmy Swaggart, Gilley cut his teeth at small clubs, eventually charting some 39 Top 10 hits and 17 No. 1 singles.

He became a Houston-area fixture as he gigged at the Nesadel Club in Pasadena. In 1970, he opened his now-famed, eponymous Gilley’s honky-tonk in Pasadena, which would eventually be known as the “world’s biggest honky-tonk.”

The club — and its legendary mechanical bull — would eventually create a memorable setting in the 1980 John Travolta smash hit, Urban Cowboy. An over-the-top movie premiere at the club in 1980 saw the likes of Lynn Wyatt, Andy Warhol, and Diane von Furstenberg. Gilley not only starred in the blockbuster, but his cover of “Stand by Me” became a pop and adult contemporary hit that year, marking a resurgence for the singer. (He later recounted that magical era with local TV legend Dave Ward.)

With Urban Cowboy putting him back in the spotlight, Gilley moved to television in the 1980s, appearing in popular series such as Murder She Wrote, The Fall Guy, Fantasy Island, and Dukes of Hazzard.

His Gilley’s club no longer operates in Pasadena (a store is located nearby), as it shuttered in 1989 due to dispute between Gilley and one-time partner Sherwood Cryer. In 1990, the honky-tonk burned down; the fire was ruled as arson by local investigators.

But the club brand also grew to an entertainment complex in Dallas, Las Vegas, and Durant, Oklahoma. Gilley’s retro gear has become a Texan “if you know, you know” fashion favorite.

The longtime Pasadena resident boasts a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, six Academy of Country Music Awards, and a place in the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame. Fittingly, a street in Pasadena is named for the star: Mickey Gilley Boulevard.

“Pasadena has lost a true legend,” Wagner said in a social media post, adding that “his talent and larger-than-life personality helped ignite a new interest in country music as he introduced the world to Pasadena through his dance hall and Urban Cowboy in 1980. We were so honored to have Mickey perform at our State of the City in February, 2020. Our prayers for comfort and peace are with Mickey’s family, his loved ones and his fans.”

Photo by Jon Shapley

Bat Out of Hell rock star and Texas native Meat Loaf dies at 74

R.I.P. Meat

Rock star Meat Loaf, a native of Texas known for his theatrical style and hits such as “Paradise by the Dashboard Light,” died on Thursday, January 20. According to a statement on his Facebook page, the singer — born Marvin Lee Aday — died on Thursday night. He was 74. A cause of death was not provided.

“Our hearts are broken to announce that the incomparable Meat Loaf passed away tonight surrounded by his wife, Deborah, daughters Pearl and Amanda, and close friends,” the statement said.

The post cited his “amazing career” that spanned six decades, with the artist selling more than 100 million albums worldwide and starring in more than 65 movies, including Fight Club, Focus, Rocky Horror Picture Show, and Waynes World.

Aday grew up in Dallas and was already singing and acting in high school before attending Lubbock Christian College and the University of North Texas. After college, he moved to Los Angeles to sing for a band called Meat Loaf Soul, and also acted in stage productions, including the Broadway production of Hair.

He eventually found massive success with Bat Out of a Hell, his collaboration with songwriter Jim Steinman, which was released in 1977, won a Grammy Award, and became one of the bestselling records in history, with worldwide sales of more than 40 million copies.

AP has a funny anecdote about his early days, when he was not yet known and was the opening act for Cheap Trick.

“I remember pulling up at the theater and it says, ‘Tonight: Cheap Trick, with Meat Loaf,’” the singer said. “And I said to myself, ‘These people think we’re serving dinner.’”

Dallas writer Robert Wilonsky recalls that the best day he ever spent at his high school was March 6, 2015, when he handed Meat Loaf his Distinguished Alumni Award.

“Upon his return to Dallas’ Thomas Jefferson, he told me to introduce him not as Marvin Aday, but as ‘Meat Loaf. Or Meat,’” Wilonsky says.

Aday was also inducted into the Texas Film Hall of Fame in 2012.

According to Variety, also in 2012, the singer purchased a nearly $1.5 million home just west of Austin.

“We know how much he meant to so many of you and we truly appreciate all of the love and support as we move through this time of grief in losing such an inspiring artist and beautiful man,” the post from his family said. “We thank you for your understanding of our need for privacy at this time. From his heart to your souls … don’t ever stop rocking!”

He’s survived by Deborah Gillespie, his wife since 2007, and daughters Pearl and Amanda Aday.

Photo by Adam Sparks

Legendary Texas barbecue pitmaster John Mueller dies at age 52

RIP to an icon

The Texas barbecue community has lost a legend. Barbecue pitmaster John Mueller, a member of the Mueller barbecue dynasty, died last week at his home in Frisco at age 52.

Daniel Vaughn, barbecue editor at Texas Monthly, broke the news December 16 on Twitter. Vaughn reports that Mueller died after a long illness.

“Mueller bounced between fame and infamy; mercurial, infuriating, hilarious, and generous would all accurately describe him. Through it all, he remained memorable,” Vaughn writes.

Mueller got his start in the barbecue business working for his father, the late Bobby Mueller, at Louie Mueller Barbecue in Taylor. He opened his first barbecue restaurant, John Mueller’s BBQ, in Austin in 2001 after leaving the family business.

Back in 2012, Mueller told CultureMap he chose Austin to grow his barbecue biz, in part, because it was in a different locale than the famed Taylor joint, located north of Austin in Williamson County.

“I wasn’t going to barbecue in the same county where my parents were,” he said. “We agreed that they couldn’t barbecue in Travis County and I wouldn’t barbecue in Williamson County.”

Mueller left Austin for several years after shutting down his restaurant in 2006, later opening the JMueller BBQ trailer. However, Mueller’s stint at the barbecue trailer, owned by sister LeAnn Mueller, lasted just one year, with the famously cantankerous pitmaster getting the boot from his sister, who eventually turned the business into the lauded and popular La Barbecue, which now resides on Austin’s east side.

Aside from his natural talent for creating succulent meats, Mueller has another claim to fame in the Texas barbecue scene, having spawned from his business one of the Austin’s most renowned pitmasters. Aaron Franklin, who owns East Austin’s Franklin Barbecue, worked for Mueller in 2006. The latter was gracious in accepting the former’s success.

“I was happy for him,” Mueller told CultureMap in 2012 of the success of Franklin Barbecue. “I’m glad that him having that pit and working for me worked out well for him. And it wasn’t long. He didn’t need that at all. He’s just flat out good at what he does.”

Mueller then moved on to start John Mueller Meat Co. in East Austin and subsequently held down jobs at Black Box Barbecue in Georgetown, Granger City Brewing in Granger, and the Granary in Jarrell, according to Austin360.

“Along the way he burned bridges with former business partners, food vendors, and the Texas comptroller’s office. Every time one of his joints closed, I thought it would be the end of the barbecue life for John Mueller,” Vaughn writes. “But he knew no other life. Mueller always found another audience to wow with his smoked beef.”

His final stint in barbecue came in Dallas-Fort Worth, where he worked for six months at Hutchins BBQ, which has locations in McKinney and Frisco.

A recent Facebook post on the La Barbecue page — which was followed by an outpouring of nearly 500 comments — noted a sentiment most Texas barbecue lovers can relate to: “Rest in peace, John Mueller. We miss you so much already!!”

Photo by Michael Anthony

San Antonio attorney Thomas J. Henry files $2 billion lawsuit against Astroworld Festival

another suit filed

Not long after news of Houston attorney Tony Buzbee filing a $750 million action against the Astroworld Festival, another Texas attorney has followed suit.

San Antonio-based trial attorney Thomas J. Henry has filed a whopping $2 billion lawsuit on behalf of victims of the Astroworld Festival event that left 10 people dead and hundreds more injured, his firm announced.

Henry’s litigation represents some 282 victims and seeks up to $2 billion in damages from a host of defendants that includes Apple Music, Travis Scott, Drake (Aubrey Drake Graham), Live Nation, and NRG Stadium.

Some 120 victims have also contacted the Thomas J. Henry firm for representation, according to a press release.

“The defendants stood to make an exorbitant amount of money off of this event, and they still chose to cut corners, cut costs, and put attendees at risk,” said Thomas J. Henry in a statement. “My clients want to ensure the defendants are held responsible for their actions, and they want to send the message to all performers, event organizers, and promoters that what happened at Astroworld cannot happen again.”

If Henry is recognizable, it’s due in part to his wide national media presence in the maelstrom after the Astroworld Festival mass-casualty event. National news outlets, such as CNN, the Daily Mail, and Vanity Fair have enlisted Henry as a talking head to assess the Astroworld/Travis Scott tragedy, the potential failing by the responsible parties, and the ensuing litigation and fallout.

Not one to shy away from three-comma filings, the San Antonio attorney has won some hefty cases, including a $1.25 billion case for sexual assault resulting in injury to a minor and $54.75 million for a pharmaceutical defect.

He also loves a good party; Henry famously threw a $10 million, celebrity-fueled bash, as CultureMap reported.

The most recent victim of the 10 to die after the November 5 Astroworld event is a 9-year-old Texas boy.

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San Antonio suburb among the richest places in Texas for 2023, plus more top stories

Hot Headlines

Editor’s note: It’s that time again — time to check in with our top stories. Here are five articles that captured our collective attention over the past seven days.

1. San Antonio suburb cashes in among the richest places in Texas for 2023. Alamo Heights has been renamed the third richest place in Texas for 2023 in a recent study.

2. San Antonio home sales slowed in December 2022, report finds. San Antonio sold 36,477 homes all year, a 10 percent decrease from 2021.

3. Here are the top 5 things to do in San Antonio this weekend. Nina Simone, Pink Floyd, the Beatles and more music-centered events made our roundup of the best things to do in Alamo City this weekend.

4. San Antonio Home & Garden Show returns with HGTV star. Ati Williams will headline the San Antonio Spring Home & Garden Show, which takes place February 24-26.

5. H-E-B opens first location in growing San Antonio suburb. The state-of-the-art facility offers 110,000 square feet of floor space, providing everything from cat food to charcuterie.


Popular Pearl brunch spot remixes with new weekend DJ nights

OONCE OONCE OONCE

Though Full Goods Diner has barely been open for half a year, it has already become a San Antonio staple for working weekday lunches and lingering Sunday Fundays. Now the Pearl eatery is looking to be a hot spot after dark.

Via release, the popular local haunt just announced a new limited-time music series, Full Goods at Night. Starting on February 2, Full Goods Diner will open select evenings throughout the month.

The Full Goods at Night series will feature popular local San Antonio DJs, including El West Side Sound, Hector Gallego, DJ Plata, Steven Lee Moya, and Cami Gee. Guests can enjoy live sets while indulging in a specially curated food and drink offerings.

The menu will include some of Full Goods Diner's best—selling items, such as French toast sticks, barbacoa waffle fries, and jumbo cheesy tots. Libations like the Attaboy Negroni, Royal Bermuda Daiquiri, Pink G&T, and more will fuel the festivities.

In addition to enjoying moonlight brunch, guests can relish some prime people-watching. And, of course, the restaurant is just a hop from other nightlife destinations like Pink Hill, 3 Star Bar, and Summer Camp Bar, making it the perfect party starter.

The series runs every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from February 2-25, 6-10 pm. The complete DJ schedule is listed below.

February 2 — El West Side Sound·
February 3 — Hector Gallego
February 4— DJ Plata
February 9 — El West Side Sound
February 10 — Steven Lee Moya
February 11 — Cami Gee
February 16 — El West Side Sound
February 17 — Steven Lee Moya
February 18 — Hector Gallego
February 23 — El West Side Sound
February 24— Steven Lee Moya
February 25 — DJ Plata

4 San Antonio culinary pioneers win $21K from the Texas Food & Wine Alliance

CULINARY INNOVATION

Texas’ skyrocketing culinary scene is about to get a huge boost. The Texas Food & Wine Alliance’s grant program has awarded $107,500 to 19 culinary innovators around the state. This marks the Alliance’s 11th year providing funding to support culinary projects contributing to local communities.

The award winners were announced in a ceremony at Austin's Holdsworth Center on January 21. A private panel of distinguished culinary experts chose the winners out of 40 grant applications this year. Nine winners hail from Austin, three from Dallas-Fort Worth, three from Houston, and four from San Antonio. The awards range from $1,500 to $10,000, with a special $25,000 grant investment from Austin favorite Tito’s Handmade Vodka in honor of the company’s 25th anniversary. Grant funding will support chefs, farms, and culinary education groups, among others.

Out of the four San Antonio area winners, Talking Tree Farm received the most from the grant program, $6,250 to purchase shipping containers for storage and to buy a solar-powered cold room for their harvests. John Marshall High School’s culinary arts program will use their $5,000 grant to establish a morning café. Agricultural project Habitable Spaces and pasture-raised chicken farm Cielito Lindo Farm also won $5,000 each to purchase equipment or build infrastructure to further their endeavors in the culinary space.

Austin-area winners received the most funding from the grant program, totalling $53,750, while San Antonio winners received $21,250 in total. Dallas/Fort Worth winners were awarded $19,750, and the three Houston recipients won $12,750. All of the 2022 winners reflect just how diverse the state's trailblazing culinary scene continues to expand.

“All of this year’s funded projects will further enrich the state through innovation and giveback,” said Erika White, executive director of the Alliance. “We’re extremely grateful to each of the Texas communities, our sponsors and their support in allowing us to reward these mold-breaking projects.”

In Austin, organic farm Trosi Farms was awarded the most funding ($10,000), which will help construct a germination shed for more stable plant start production. Locavore pioneer Boggy Creek Farm won $7,500 in grants to provide ADA-compliant accessibility to their new climate-controlled Tomato House, while Texas’ first organic feed mill, Coyote Creek Organic Feed Mill & Farm, received $6,250 to help purchase a building to be used as a store for the local community.

The six other Austin area grant recipients, each winning $5,000, include Vista Farms at Vista Brewing, Jamaican family business Tierra Todun ATX, coffee roasters Rising Tide Roast Collaborative, culinary educator Chef Pascal Simon from Bake Austin, East Austin food truck Community Vegan, and Latinx pastry project Comadre Panaderia (who also just earned a James Beard nomination). All winners will be able to use their grants to improve efficiency and expand their businesses, or in Chef Pascal's case, further research and development for her upcoming cookbook for Gen-Z young adults.

After starting the program in Austin, grant co-chair and TFWA past president Cathy Cochran-Lewis says it was the Alliance’s dream to expand the grant statewide.

“We’re so humbled and thrilled to now not only support worthwhile projects across Texas but also to give more than a half million dollars in funding over the last decade to help dreams come true,” she says. “This is a tribute to the culinary talent and the community mindset we are lucky to have in our state.”

The winners in the Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston areas include:

For this year's Honorable Mention, the Alliance chose San Antonio eatery Tacos Cucuy, who will soon open a brick-and-mortar space with an expanded menu. Tacos Cucuy are currently looking for support to develop a Tex-Mex charcuterie program called La Cura Carnes Especiales.

More information about the 2022 grants and its recipients can be found on texasfoodandwinealliance.org.