Art for All

Stunning new public art piece ripples through San Antonio's Westside

Stunning new public art piece ripples through San Antonio's Westside

Aguas Onduladas Elmendorf Lake Park
Aguas Onduladas is illuminated at night, both for safety and to serve as a local landmark. Photo courtesy of the City of San Antonio
Aguas Onduladas Elmendorf Lake Park
The sculpture now sits in Elmendorf Lake Park. Photo courtesy of the City of San Antonio
Aguas Onduladas Elmendorf Lake Park
San Antonio's first poet laureate, Carmen Tafoll, wrote the words on the piece.  Photo courtesy of the City of San Antonio
Aguas Onduladas Elmendorf Lake Park
Aguas Onduladas Elmendorf Lake Park
Aguas Onduladas Elmendorf Lake Park

San Antonio's newest public artwork is rippling through Elmendorf Lake Park. Inspired by the nearby lake, Aguas Onduladas is a unique collaboration between artists and poets, transforming the written word into a unique interactive experience. 

Aguas Onduladas was commissioned by the City of San Antonio and is a collaboration between the Iowa-based RDG Dahlquist Art Studio and San Antonio's inaugural Poet Laureate (and former Texas State Poet Laureate), Carmen Tafolla. Comprised of stainless steel "waves," the piece is meant to evoke the feeling of looking into water and seeing a reflection in return. 

Written on the waves, which range from 3 feet to 12 feet in size, are lines from Tafolla's poems Cada Sueño and River Music, which passersby are invited to read and reflect upon.

At night, the interior of the sculpture is illuminated with amber light, which, according to the city, "references ... the warm glow of front porch lights found throughout San Antonio’s Westside neighborhoods." It also serves as an illuminated landmark for the neighborhood.

"The richness of this public artwork is how it truly does what public art is intended to do — it represents the people and identity of the space it is in," said District 5 Councilwoman Shirley Gonzales in a release.

"Incorporating elements that honor the natural surroundings and the cultural richness of the community makes this art installation one that all San Antonio residents and visitors should experience because it tells a unique story," the councilwoman continued.

Aguas Onduladas is now open to the public, following a dedication ceremony on June 28, during which Tafolla read the poems on the sculpture.